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Getting budget approved for a whole new project can be daunting. There are lots of factors that need to be considered – such as timing, stakeholders’ needs and other priorities facing the business. If you’re thinking about implementing SharePoint within your company, it might seem like yet another ‘cost’ to the business.

Obviously the more compelling the business case for your solution the more chance it has of being delivered, but what about the more common place systems that tend to fall down the priority list? Getting budget approval for those can be hard.

However, you can use your Software Assurance benefits to get access to SharePoint Deployment Planning Services (SDPS); you might find that you’ll be able to save on the cost for your SharePoint project.

What is SDPS?

SDPS provide your company with a collaborative consulting engagement based on best practices from Microsoft. You select a Microsoft Gold Partner with competencies in SharePoint (you’ll never have guessed, but we are such a Partner!).

The Partner will work with you to create a roadmap for transforming your SharePoint environment. Depending on the engagement length, your SharePoint roadmap can include:

  • A strategy briefing that defines the vision for achieving technical and business goals
  • An architectural design session that introduces SharePoint technologies, solutions, and concepts
  • A deployment planning session for a specific SharePoint capability
  • A proof of concept session to demonstrate the solution within your environment

SDPS, when used correctly, can really help unlock budget and, importantly, deliver the environment you need to remove multiple business headaches.

Am I eligible for SDPS?

You can check this on the Microsoft Volume License Services by clicking here.

Note: Activating your Software Assurance Benefits requires administrator rights so best to enquire as to who is your Microsoft primary or benefits contact.

You can also visit the Software Assurance website for more information on eligibility.

It is of course, still worth pointing out other factors in your business case for implementing SharePoint. (Our guide on ‘Quick wins in SharePoint’ highlights lots of areas to strengthen your argument for SharePoint. It covers reporting, automation, workflow, business intelligence and more).

Separate your needs from your wants

When building a sound business case, it’s important to avoid including everything you want all in one go. SharePoint can do a lot of things for your company, including streamlining workflows by way of automation, improving your data reporting and also your document and records management systems. It’s tempting to lay it all out in a proposal, but think about what you need rather than what’s a ‘nice to have’. Prioritising your biggest headaches first addresses the urgency to get the project underway.

These problems can include anything from:

  • Needing a new Intranet
  • Struggling with user adoption
  • Migration of systems to Office 365
  • Going from on-premises to the Cloud

…these are just a few! Signalling your most critical issues first can help you get the approval you need.

Illustrate the value in the technology

You don’t want the business case to just be a list of headaches and perilous problems. A positive (but realistic!) proposal can be very useful in unlocking the budget. Not only will you be mentioning the problems you’ve got, but by pointing out how they will benefit the company, you’ll be looking at the situation from another perspective. You’re in an even better position if your business case solves the problems of multiple departments and areas in the business.

Using your Software Assurance benefits to access SDPS is one quick win on how you can unlock budget for a big project. Implementing platforms like SharePoint can be an effortless process once the wheels start turning!

As a Microsoft Gold Partner, we can assist with all things SharePoint, from implementation right down to the daily use of the platform. Just get in touch if you’d like to know more!

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